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Security Token Insight: Expert Interview with Patrick Campos of Securrency + Preview of October’s Security Token Industry Launch Week

Expert Interview


 
 Patrick Campos, Chief Strategy Officer of Securrency

Patrick Campos

Patrick provides high-level strategic guidance and creative solutions rooted in rich experience. He has worked with clients across multiple industries around the world as a strategic consultant and as a lawyer with three top-tier international law firms, giving him deep transactional and project experience – as well as hands-on understanding of the start-up and growth stages of company development. Patrick has worked with leading energy companies, developers of industrial and real estate projects, and banks on large-scale projects, acquisitions, divestitures, and financings on six continents. His core areas of professional activity are strategic planning (including capital strategy, go-to-market strategy, international expansion strategy and product distribution strategy), transaction and project structuring, deal negotiation, and problem-solving. His industry experience includes energy, agriculture, telecommunications, information technology, hotels, transportation infrastructure, sports management, and music & entertainment. Patrick also has extensive experience with capital markets transactions, project and trade financings, as well as recourse and non-recourse acquisition financings. Patrick is a graduate of Arizona State University (BA, magna cum laude) and the Georgetown University Law Centre (juris doctor). He also served as an officer in the United States Marine Corps, attaining the rank of Captain.

LinkedIn    |    Company

Securrency is a financial services technology infrastructure and products company that delivers decentralized investment banking services built around core universal identity, custody, and interoperability technology. This lightweight, yet powerful, infrastructure supports Securrency’s complete suite of compliance and financial services products to enable the creation, maintenance, transfer, and secondary trading of tokenized securities by issuers, broker-dealers, alternative trading system (ATS) operators, and exchange operators.

Securrency is a Platinum Corporate Member of the Security Token Academy. Learn more here.

Transcript


 

Adam Chapnick:

The security token industry is here, and it’s still not too late for you to get involved. Coming up on this episode of Security Token Insight, tZERO issues its preferred tZERO security tokens.

Amy Wan:

Plus, highlights from Security Token Industry Launch Week. That and much more is coming up on this episode of Security Token Insight.

Adam Chapnick:

Hey, everybody. I’m Adam Chapnick.

Amy Wan:

And I’m Amy Wan. Welcome to Security Token Insight, brought to you by the Security Token Academy. The security token industry is gaining momentum and will provide a key foundation for the growing financial internet.

Adam Chapnick:

Security Token Academy provides insights about this new era for security token enthusiasts, investors, and issuers.

Amy Wan:

Coming up on today’s episode of Security Token Insight, in your security token investing news, big news from tZERO as the company issues their security tokens. We’ll tell you how much was raised. We have an expert interview with Patrick Campos, Chief Strategy Officer at Securrency, plus highlights from the Security Token L.A. Meetup panel discussion on regulations. Also, we’ll take a look back at all the events across the nation marking Security Token Industry Launch Week.

Adam Chapnick:

Now it’s time for your security token investing news. Real Coin has enlisted Securitize to help with its security token offering. The new blockchain-based security token helps provide liquidity to investments that are generally known to be illiquid. Real Coin is looking to fix the liquidity and accessibility barriers in the property market. Their token gives holders fractional equity ownership interest in the company’s diversified property fund.

In other news, Overstock’s tZERO has issued their first security tokens after raising $143 million in their security token offering. More than 1,000 investors from around the world participated in the STO. There’s a 90-day lockup period for investors to ensure compliance with securities law and regulations. That means that you could trade them on a secondary market starting on January 10th of next year.

And finally, the Security Token Academy has been featured in dozens of articles about our recent Security Token Industry Launch Week. There was a great writeup on Medium.com covering the conference at the Conrad. There was also an in-depth review posted on Crowdfund Insiders website. Be sure to check out both of these articles and tell us what you think. More on Launch Week coming up in minutes, as well as details on our next Meetup.

Amy Wan:

The Security Token Academy is on the leading edge of the security token industry. We interview top experts, lawyers, and business leaders from around the world.

Adam Chapnick:

That’s right. I had the pleasure of sitting down with Patrick Campos. He’s the Chief Strategy Officer at Securrency, and he’s also a lawyer. Securrency is also a platinum corporate member of the Security Token Academy. Hear about their latest security token protocol, the CAT-20, and much more in this expert interview.

Okay, so for everybody who hasn’t yet heard of you, can you give us just the quick rundown on what is Securrency?

Patrick Campos:

That’s incredibly difficult because Securrency is a pretty comprehensive platform, but I could summarize it maybe easily with three aspects: one is, we have an issuance platform with what we call decentralized investment banking services; so the onboarding, issuance, tools, as well as the back office token maintenance support. The second part of it is we’ve got interoperability tools to promote liquidity for security tokens through the use of identity and credentialing services, and interoperability. And then the result of that is the third thing, which is our new superior token protocol, the CAT-20, which stands for Compliance Aware Token, which is what we believe to be the world’s first truly interoperable, multi-ledger security token protocol.

Adam Chapnick:

That’s a huge deal, a huge deal.

Patrick Campos:

That’s a big deal.

Adam Chapnick:

Tell us about this new protocol, and tell us why interoperability is such a game changer, which it is.

Patrick Campos:

It’s all about liquidity. It’s all about finding the players in the secondary market where they are. And so that ability to move tokens, security tokens, not just from one chain to the other, but also off chain where you have legacy systems, or across exchanges, while retaining the compliance features and the identity features. That’s critical. It’s critical for the interlinking of these various pools of liquidity worldwide, so we call it the network effect, of course, which is establishing really a decentralized network of centralized pools of liquidity, if you will.

Adam Chapnick:

Now bring it back to the caveman, which is, that’s my job. I’m the resident caveman. If I’m doing an issuance, why would it make a difference to me, what are the benefits that I get from having interoperability? You’re talking about having access to lots of different pools of liquidity, but in caveman terms, what does that do for me that just hasn’t been possible before?

Patrick Campos:

Great question. At the end of the day, if I issue a security token to someone who’s just going to hold it for 30 years and never do anything with it, I’ve just basically ... It’s a gimmick. There’s no additional value to that token holder who has no intent to do anything with it beside from, perhaps, some secondary features where we might ... We were speaking earlier here about things like tokenizing or representing collateral interests. But if we ignore those pieces of it, the reality is what makes that security token more valuable is the fact that it is more liquid; is the fact that now you can appeal to a whole different set of investors who are not long-hold investors, who are interested in having things that they can exchange when they need to exchange them as individual investors or institutional investors when they need a liquidity event.

So, that presupposes that you have liquidity; you’ve got to create the conditions for liquidity in the first place. Security tokens become more valuable and more marketable as a result of the promise of liquidity on the back end. And that liquidity is established by the very fact that those tokens are a digital form, that are easily exchangeable, and now with our protocols, exchangeable in a highly interoperable manner across different exchanges, across different ledgers, that sort of thing.

Adam Chapnick:

So if I’m an issuer, I’m a young startup and I want to give investors access to what I’m building, something that I can offer them is the idea that, okay, you can get into my company, but relatively quickly there are going to be a lot of people who didn’t know about us, but when they hear about us, they’re going to want us.

Patrick Campos:

They’re going to want a piece of it .

Adam Chapnick:

Right. And now with your new protocol, many, many more people will be able to buy my investors’ tokens, right?

Patrick Campos:

That’s right.

Adam Chapnick:

That’s the bottom line, like caveman.

Patrick Campos:

That’s right. That’s it its simplest form.

Adam Chapnick:

And it’s a big deal.

Patrick Campos:

That’s it right there.

Adam Chapnick:

And it’s a really big deal, I think, for issuers. I think especially in such a nascent community, industry as we have, there’s just not that many places where people can do any kind of secondary trading.

Patrick Campos:

That’s right.

Adam Chapnick:

And you guys are making it possible to kind of turbo charge that for issuers, which I think is ... I don’t know if people understand what a big deal it is, but it’s a really big deal.

Patrick Campos:

Yeah. Thank you for saying that because we’re really excited about it, too. It’s great, first of all, organizations like Security Token Academy that understand that this really is the future of finance and are getting the word on the street, that is actually helping to legitimize something that I think a lot of people would say isn’t this just sort of a new form of the old ICO? And it’s not. It’s really a new form of the old finance, system of finance that’s leveraging and taking advantage of the technological benefits that we saw coming out of the cryptocurrency world. That is, as you said, this is truly game-changing stuff.

Adam Chapnick:

Can you for our viewers explain a little bit about what you just touched on? Security tokens, what are the things that make them much more versatile and powerful than the old, I guess I would call it the file cabinet model?

Patrick Campos:

Right.

Adam Chapnick:

What will they do?

Patrick Campos:

So first of all, one of the key features of where people want to go with security tokens, and actually where we are with our CAT-20 protocol, is what we call automated governance, if you will. We leverage a proprietary piece of technology that we have called the Rules Engine, which really writes into the token the rules that apply. First of all, for that transaction, there are transactional rules. So we might say, hey, my minimum ticket size is going to be $100,000, or I only want my tokens to be held by graduates of Arizona State University. I happen to be a graduate of Arizona State University.

Adam Chapnick:

I’m so surprised.

Patrick Campos:

Undergrad. But there are also, obviously, regulatory rules that apply across different jurisdictions. So that token, now we call it Compliance Awareness. That’s the patent that we filed. It is aware of what it can or cannot do. That’s new, that’s never existed before. Normally, you would have to find a bunch of professional advisors who are themselves aware of what you can and consult with them. Now the token ... You consult with them once, you write those rules into the token, and now the token is self-governing in that respect. That’s incredibly different ...

Adam Chapnick:

Yes.

Patrick Campos:

... and that establishes really that first part of the liquidity that we keep talking about.

Adam Chapnick:

Right. And now Securrency, can it help me if I’m a new issuer; you can help me from soup to nuts, really, right? So if I just say, “Hey, I’ve heard there’s this thing called security tokens. It might be better than just doing stock certificates.”

Patrick Campos:

Yep, that’s right.

Adam Chapnick:

I just call us Securrency and you guys help me out, right?

Patrick Campos:

That’s right. We do work directly with issuers, but one thing that I think is really important is a word that’s used and maybe misused a lot is disintermediation. And we’re not actually looking to disintermediate a lot of the actors that are in the space already. We’re not looking to disintermediate the bankers or the lawyers. They still have their very critical roles to perform. What we do is we actually provide them with tools on a white label basis typically. So actually, you could call Securrency and we could provide those tools to you directly, or you could go to a broker-dealer who has our tools and is white labeling those.

What we don’t do, because we’re just a technology company, we don’t market. You still need to go to a broker-dealer to market your securities, and we give them the tools on a white label basis so that they can provide these incredible new technological resources to you.

Adam Chapnick:

Got it, okay. So where do you see this new protocol taking us that we aren’t today?

Patrick Campos:

Well, first of all it is that key to interoperability. One of the things, and I think you’ve spoken with our CEO, Dan, about this.

Adam Chapnick:

Yes. Dan Doney, amazing interview. Check it out at SecurityTokenAcademy.com.

Patrick Campos:

Absolutely. It was an amazing interview, by the way.

Adam Chapnick:

It was.

Patrick Campos:

From both sides. So it’s a good watch, I concur. We would both give it two thumbs up.

Adam Chapnick:

Four. Four thumbs up.

Patrick Campos:

There we go. What was the question again? We were talking about ...

Adam Chapnick:

I’m just ... You’ve got this amazing, sort of revolutionary protocol. How do you guys see it changing things in the future from the way we do things today?

Patrick Campos:

So where I was going with that in terms of the limitation to one ledger, for example. If you think about it from a government’s perspective; a simple thing that I know that Dan talked about. If you think of it from a government’s perspective and you say, okay, here’s a good idea. Let’s move trillions of dollars of the nation’s economy onto one ledger.

Adam Chapnick:

Oh, God.

Patrick Campos:

The question sort of answers itself, right? So number one, one of the things that our protocol is able to do is what we call sort of disaster recovery. We can literally lift a cap table off of one ledger and drop it onto another ledger in case there’s a hack or whatever, so this is really important. But that’s in the worst case scenario. That’s disaster recovery.

Adam Chapnick:

That’s a big deal.

Patrick Campos:

It is a big deal. Preserving value is a big deal. And not just preserving value in recovering it, but minimizing the time of disruption in the financial markets. But the other part of it, and we’ve been talking a little bit about it, is the interconnection of these different pools of liquidity, and the ability to allow a user on one platform to see that there is a identified, credentialed user on another platform; not know anything about that person except that that is someone, there’s a wallet out there that can accept this token and a transaction can now occur. So, universal credentialing-

Adam Chapnick:

Sorry to interrupt.

Patrick Campos:

No, please.

Adam Chapnick:

But I think that’s something that I think a lot of people don’t even realize is a issue right now.

Patrick Campos:

That’s right.

Adam Chapnick:

So can you describe what it would be like right now, someone on one platform, what don’t they know? They don’t know about that other guy. Why?

Patrick Campos:

This is a really crude analogy ...

Adam Chapnick:

Perfect.

Patrick Campos:

... but I like it because ...

Adam Chapnick:

I’m a crude man.

Patrick Campos:

And I’m a pretty simple dude myself, so this is how it works. If I want to get in my car, I have a California driver’s license and I want to drive to Texas, what I don’t want to do is get stopped at the Arizona border and told I need to take a whole new driving test and be issued a new driver’s license so that I can proceed on. And then I get to New Mexico and the same thing happens all over again. Right? So even though I’ve been issued a California driver’s license, my credentials are recognized across all of those states so that I can continue on my drive, and I am qualified to continue on my drive. I have a license that says that I have the proper credentials.

That license also contains my identity. So if somebody needs to know who is this person and do they have the right to drive, there it is. That’s my license right there. That’s a very, very simplified way of describing what we’re really doing here, which is saying we need to, for compliance purposes we need to ... We need to know that that person is who they say that they are, number one. And number two, we need to identify what credentials that person has; what rights that person has with respect to a particular transaction.

So we say in the case of Transaction A, we know who you are and you’re a retail investor. That’s fine, you can participate. But in Transaction B, you need to be in a credit investor. Oh wait, by the way, you’re not a resident of the United States? Okay, under Reg-S, that’s fine. So that credentialing process and the rules that are built into the token allow for the instantaneous identification of those people.

So in this case, for example, let’s assume that we now have a token that is freely tradable. It’s a security token but now it’s freely tradable ... you think, but that’s not exactly correct. Can I trade that token to someone in North Korea? Well, it turns out that I can’t for a whole different set of regulations having nothing to do ... So we still need that type of distribution control, even in an environment where we think that we have free trading. You still have other factors that you ...

So, distribution control continues to be an issue. And if you’re an issuer, you really don’t want to wake up in the morning and find out that there are people on your cap table who aren’t supposed to be there, and that’s distribution control. It continues to be important.

Adam Chapnick:

So it couldn’t be clearer about why that is useful. And so today, without that, are people forced to confine themselves to California, as it were, in their understanding of their users, or their investors, or their token holders?

Patrick Campos:

It’s actually funny that you should say that. I’ll share an interesting anecdote off-camera with you about that very question about just California. But ... What people are doing is sort of taking, there are a number of different approaches that people take. Sometimes they’ll say, well look, we’ll lock down the tokens for 12 months and then they become freely tradable, and so off they go. I think that people have recognized that that’s not going to do for the reasons that I just pointed out. So then, another approach that people are taking ...

Adam Chapnick:

To just keep following them, but that doesn’t do because at 12 months, you’d still need to know where it’s going. Right? Is that ...

Patrick Campos:

I like to say it’s like putting someone in a car and sending them at 100 miles an hour toward the river, and you say, “There’s no bridge there, but don’t worry. By the time you get there, maybe there’ll be one.” It’s not useful, right?

I think that methodology has passed. We now see predominantly the use of white lists and smart contracts on the Ethereum network with the RC-20 tokens. That’s a fairly manual process on both sides. The white list is fairly prescriptive, and of course smart contracts can be pretty cumbersome, too, to write. We do that in a much more simplified and, if I may say so, elegant way in that we don’t need a white list. We don’t need to identify, oh, I know who that person is and he’s qualified. We simply say these are the attributes that one must possess in order to participate in this. And the token looks out and says, “I see that wallet, I see that wallet. That one has the right attributes. That one doesn’t.” And that’s how it works.

The methods that are being used now, they are useful, but I think that they are transitional methods. And ultimately what Securrency has developed is a ... We believe it’s the ... We say it’s the standard for the future of finance. We think that there will be one protocol; one protocol that basically everyone can all use and interoperate, and we think that we have it.

Adam Chapnick:

One protocol to rule them all?

Patrick Campos:

One protocol to rule them all.

Adam Chapnick:

One protocol to bind them?

Patrick Campos:

Not to bind them.

Adam Chapnick:

One protocol ... I forget how the rest of it goes. In the darkness, find me ... So Securrency, this is amazing. This protocol is launching when?

Patrick Campos:

At your event on Friday.

Adam Chapnick:

At our event. This is the Security Token Academy New York Launch Event this Friday. Amazing.

Patrick Campos:

Yes, it is. Yes, it is.

Adam Chapnick:

Or I should have said maybe it’s last Friday, at the time we see this video.

Patrick Campos:

But it’s still this Friday for us.

Adam Chapnick:

Yes, for us here in real time. And now what about for Securrency as a company. Once that’s happened, what’s the plan for the next six months? What’s happening?

Patrick Campos:

We’re trying to get the word out really to all of the other players in this space that a rising tide lifts all boats. What we’re really trying to do is talk to all of the folks who are also issuance platforms and say, listen, let’s all cooperate because here’s the deal. We can be super clever, and if the security token economy never takes off, we failed just like everybody else and that’s not useful. But what is really important is that we demonstrate to a global community of financial services professionals, of investors, of regulators, that this is not just viable, but it is a truly evolutionary step; that this is really the future.

Adam Chapnick:

It’s transformative.

Patrick Campos:

It’s transformative, exactly. And so we all have to really work together. We want to make our protocol available to issuance platforms and advisors so that we can create this truly sort of networked ecosystem to establish that kind of liquidity that we were talking about earlier, and so that’s really what we’re going to be focused on. We will be working, of course, with issuers to demonstrate how really, really functional our technology is.

But beyond that, I think we’re going to be working really closely with a lot of venue operators, the exchanges, whether they be ATSs or crypto exchanges with other issuance platform, and with all the really incredibly talented and forward-thinking people who are operating in this space to really establish this security token economy.

Adam Chapnick:

If you want to learn more about Securrency, go to our website, SecurityTokenAcademy.com and click on the directory page, and look up Securrency.

Amy Wan:

Great interview, Adam. We’ve met and dozens more people at the Security Token L.A. Meetup on October 1st. The Meetup was the official kick-off so Security Token Industry Launch Week. The Los Angeles Meetup was held inside Maggiano’s at The Grove. It was a packed house, as security token enthusiasts and industry leaders came together to talk about security tokens, and to enjoy some great food and drinks.

Adam Chapnick:

Amy and I presided over the event that featured a great spotlight talk by Tatiana Kaufman, Chief Token Officer at Full Cycle Fund. Our crew was also busy all night conducting one-on-one interviews with attendees. We’ll be posting those in the coming weeks on our website on the Interviews page.

Amy Wan:

The evening also included a special panel discussion on security token regulations. I moderated the panel that included Jor Law, co-founder of Verify Investor, LLC, and Allen Jebsen, Director of Business Development at StartEngine. Take a look.

What is your vision of what the security token industry can or should be, and how do you think it’ll take to get there? Do you want to start?

Allen Jebsen:

Sure, I’ll start. Hi, everyone. Very good question, Amy. I think Tatiana made some good points, especially about letting the market settle a bit. There’s a lot of companies out there with big visions for what we want the security token landscape to be. I definitely envision primary issuance platforms like StartEngine, but also companies that are thinking of primary issuance with the secondary trading in mind, as that gentleman had a question about.

That’s probably where the industry is going, is how do we issue security tokens that are in compliance and are in regulations, but more importantly, synced up with the ATS and the exchange systems out there for robust trading. Because we all know the ICO market last summer, it really exploded and that was probably large in part because of the unregulated exchange, and the ability for anyone to make a quick buck off of these coins. So if we can emulate that type of activity on the regulated side in the secondary market, I think that’s where the true vision is going to be.

Amy Wan:

Fantastic. Jor, vision and timeline?

Jor Law:

I think that unless we come into a process where we realize that the technology isn’t quite there yet, I think that everything gets pretty much tokenized. And by everything, I mean not just securities; people are thinking about the equity securities, but also DAP. And frankly, anytime someone goes and starts a company, even if it’s with three people, even if it’s technically not a security because you’re the sole operator, I think that one day that just gets tokenized.

The reason I think that is because if you think of how the world works today, which is largely some sort of hybrid form of either paper securities or digital securities, and then you realize that if you agree that digital is generally better than paper, and then you agree that decentralized is better than centralized, then you’ve got a double spend problem unless you’re using some sort of blockchain or decentralized ledger technology, um you’ve got some issues.

So if you’ve agreed that you’ve got to go digital, and you want to try to decentralize to some degree, then you kind of have to go blockchain, you kind of have to go DLT. And I think, therefore, it will have to go that way. I think you’ll start seeing early simple deals this year or next year. But the trend of getting every company in the world over, it’s going to be decades.

Amy Wan:

The U.S. SEC has gone down a certain regulatory path, right? They said, okay, the Howey Test applies; all our case law from the past several decades applies. And the U.S. right now, at least in the regulatory playing spaces, is a little bit lonely. Will the other countries follow suit, or are they going to exploit regulatory arbitrage? Where is all this going from an international or global perspective?

Allen Jebsen:

I think they will follow suit. I think other countries are not interested in their citizens getting ripped off potentially with this unregulated market, so I think it’s in their best interest. I think the U.S. was particularly innovative in crowdfunding and jobs act regulations that, as we know, are used to help issuers raise capital from the public, but that notion did start in Europe in the beginning. UK has had those laws, and other European countries have had crowdfunding, private securities laws in place before the U.S.

So in some ways, they’re a little more advanced in that thinking. But I definitely think they larger countries, the larger GDP countries are going to follow suit. I think there’s always going to be the Cayman Islands or the Gibraltars of the world that are going to be a little bit in question, but for the majority part, I think they’re going to follow suit.

Jor Law:

Yeah, I think so. I think certainly there’s some jurisdictions that are going to be friendlier. They don’t have to worry about protecting their citizens that much if all the investors are really outside anyway. So if they make their country or their jurisdiction more friendly, then they will attract some business and we’ve already seen that.

That being said, if the U.S. does something, a lot of people are going to pay attention and they might fall in line. And you see some countries like Singapore, which are starting to become a little bit tighter, even though they’ve been seen as they’re Switzerland, a little bit more loose, and that’s getting closer to the U.S. stance.

I do think that over time that U.S. laws will improve. I don’t think that they’re necessarily wrong to take a hard stance now, and the same laws that they’re applying to the blockchain are the same laws that built the largest economy in the world, so they’re not necessarily that bad.

Amy Wan:

I want to follow up on that comment, right, because in blockchain we often hear the word decentralize, everything is so decentralized, it’s immutable. We’re creating an entirely new paradigm. And yet securities laws and all of these laws really apply to centralized organizations. So, whereas you see this U.S. approach of, okay, we’re going to apply old law; we’re going to have guidance and clarification; then you see other countries like Japan where it’s like, okay, we’re just going to create an entirely new set of laws for all this stuff in crypto and blockchain. Do you have any comments on that approach? Do you think some countries are going to follow that instead?

Jor Law:

This is interesting. I think that it’s easier right now to obviously just play within the current paradigm, but there are some issues with it, of course. I think until everyone trusts the technology to replace incumbent staff they know they can regulate and they know they can enforce against, you might kind of be stuck for the short period, at least here in the U.S., with going through the existing players and existing set of laws, which will get changed unless the financial institutions that are coming in with the lobby power choose not to change it because they hold all the cards. It’s hard to say.

Allen Jebsen:

I think the U.S. is going to hold firm. I think the SEC is just trying to figure out exactly how to regulate this in the best way possible, but there have been new financial regulations that have been passed that are very innovative, like the Jobs Act. So we’re still in the early ages of companies being able to use those regulations in a much more innovative way, and I think the SEC has pretty much laid a groundwork, a set of rules for companies to follow. But the possibilities are endless if you can raise a large amount of money from the public in security token fashion’s the right way. I think it’s still trying to figure out how do we use these rules that have just been created in the past five or six years, and use that as kind of the innovative framework first before thinking of new types of regulations to pass.

Amy Wan:

So if you guys had one regulatory wish, one thing that you could do to change our current regulatory ecosystem in this industry, what would it be? What does it look like? Are we talking about a regulatory sandbox, or use your imagination. What would you wish for?

To find out Alan and Jor’s answers, be sure to watch the full panel discussion on our website, SecurityTokenAcademy.com, and click on the interviews page.

Adam Chapnick:

As Amy mentioned, that meetup was the start of Security Token Industry Launch Week. The week was marked with events from coast to coast. We traveled from Los Angeles to New York for next Meetup that was held inside the New York Marriott Downtown. On Thursday, we boarded the Spirit of New York yacht from Chelsea Harbor for an evening cruise along the Hudson River. There was dancing, gourmet food, the drinks were flowing, everybody was having a great time networking. The night was fantastic.

The week ended in a big way, with the Security Token Industry Launch event inside the Conrad New York. Hundreds of people were in attendance, as industry leaders rang the opening bell to signal the official kickoff to the Security Token Industry. It was quite the moment.

Amy Wan:

The all-day conference included keynote addresses by David Weild, CEO of Weild and Company, and former Vice-Chairman of NASDAQ. Fabian Vogelstellar, founder of Lukso, an Ethereum developer, and creator of the ERC-20 token standard, as well as panel discussions from the top business leaders in the industry from around the world.

If you missed on this world class event, we will be putting all of the content on our website, SecurityTokenAcademy.com, so keep checking back.

Adam Chapnick:

And mark your calendar for our next Security Token Meetup. It takes place Tuesday, November 20th inside Maggiano’s at The Grove in Los Angeles. Yes, free food, drinks, networking and more. You can find all the details on our website. Just click on the events page. You can also visit us on our meetup page at the address on your screen. We had a great turnout last time, so be sure to RSVP to secure your spot to this free event.

Amy Wan:

Okay, that’s it for today’s episode. Be sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Telegram, and Medium. And don’t forget to subscribe to out YouTube page so you don’t miss out on any of our videos and expert interviews. I’m Amy Wan.

Adam Chapnick:

And I’m Adam Chapnick. And before we go, a big thank you to our platinum corporate members, Merrill Lynch and Securrency. And for everyone here at the Security Token Academy, thank you for watching.

Want to learn more about security token from the top leaders in the industry? Well be sure to visit our website, Security TokenAcademy.com and click on the interviews tab so you can stay tuned in.